Attack of the Alien Invaders, National Geographic Magazine: Compassion For Unwanted Feral Cats

Group portrait of a litter of sweet, young yellow kittens

A litter of feral kittens are dropped at the doorstep of a clinic run by Caring for Cats in Islamorada, Florida. The Keys have an enormous feral cat problem—an estimated 10,000 feral cats live on the chain of islands. Though cute when they are little, the kittens grow up learning to survive in the wild by hunting and are partly responsible for the decline in the songbird population.

Caring for Cats is an all volunteer, no-kill shelter and foster network for cats and kittens in Florida. Feral cats are trapped, spayed or neutered, vaccinated, tested for feline AIDS and leukemia, and their left ear is clipped to show they’ve been caught. Then they are released (or adopted if possible) and fed by volunteers. Programs like this are controversial because they release feral cats back into the wild.

Feral cats are listed on the world’s top 100 worst invasive aliens.

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